BACK

Bishops’ Palace

1°C
Katedros a. 5, Telšiai
Listen
Routes

Telšiai, located in the Curonian lands, was first mentioned in written sources in 1450. In 1791, the city was granted the Magdeburg Rights. During the same year, Bernardine monks built a stone church on a hill, which, in 1926, after the establishment of the Telšiai Diocese, became a Cathedral. The first school was established in 1793. In 1875, a yeshiva was opened in the city, although it was moved to Cleveland in 1941. Telšiai was developing rapidly both at the end of the 19th century and during the interwar period. A railway line, built in 1932, became one of the main contributors towards its growth together with industrial development and numerous public initiatives. The legacy of this rapid development that took place in the interwar period is an ensemble of Modernist architecture.

Even today, when reading the press, one can find the epithet Samogitian Vatican, a term used to refer to the complex of buildings in Telšiai belonging to the diocese. It becomes evident, whilst reading the interwar press, that the significance of these buildings was even greater back then. The palace is very spacious, comfortable, very beautiful and with all modern equipment. In addition, it’s built in the most beautiful spot of Telšiai, wrote a correspondent in the newspaper Lietuvos aidas (Echo of Lithuania) published on August 19, 1930.

In 1926, after the establishment of the Lithuanian Church province, the Diocese of Samogitia was divided into three new ones, namely the dioceses of Kaunas, Panevėžys and Telšiai. The new bishops’ palace was such a serious challenge that it was the architects of the temporary capital that were entrusted with the project. The palace project was created by engineer Povilas Taračkovas and adjusted by Vladimiras Dubeneckis. He received help from Povilas Taračkovas and specialists from Klaipėda. A quarter of a million litas (the former currency of Lithuania) was allocated for the two-hull, two storey building. The architectural solution of the building is neo-Baroque, and is inspired by its adjacent buildings.

Various activities took place on the first floor of the bishops’ palace where there was an archive, Curia, other diocesan institutions, a buffet and a dining room. The pre-war bishop, Justinas Staugaitis, lived on the second floor beneath the gabled roof, and there were also guest rooms and a hall for different events and a chapel.

In 2018, the building was renovated. The Curia of the Diocese of Telšiai now operates inside the building.

Bishops’ Palace

Katedros a. 5, Telšiai

Telšiai, located in the Curonian lands, was first mentioned in written sources in 1450. In 1791, the city was granted the Magdeburg Rights. During the same year, Bernardine monks built a stone church on a hill, which, in 1926, after the establishment of the Telšiai Diocese, became a Cathedral. The first school was established in 1793. In 1875, a yeshiva was opened in the city, although it was moved to Cleveland in 1941. Telšiai was developing rapidly both at the end of the 19th century and during the interwar period. A railway line, built in 1932, became one of the main contributors towards its growth together with industrial development and numerous public initiatives. The legacy of this rapid development that took place in the interwar period is an ensemble of Modernist architecture.

Even today, when reading the press, one can find the epithet Samogitian Vatican, a term used to refer to the complex of buildings in Telšiai belonging to the diocese. It becomes evident, whilst reading the interwar press, that the significance of these buildings was even greater back then. The palace is very spacious, comfortable, very beautiful and with all modern equipment. In addition, it’s built in the most beautiful spot of Telšiai, wrote a correspondent in the newspaper Lietuvos aidas (Echo of Lithuania) published on August 19, 1930.

In 1926, after the establishment of the Lithuanian Church province, the Diocese of Samogitia was divided into three new ones, namely the dioceses of Kaunas, Panevėžys and Telšiai. The new bishops’ palace was such a serious challenge that it was the architects of the temporary capital that were entrusted with the project. The palace project was created by engineer Povilas Taračkovas and adjusted by Vladimiras Dubeneckis. He received help from Povilas Taračkovas and specialists from Klaipėda. A quarter of a million litas (the former currency of Lithuania) was allocated for the two-hull, two storey building. The architectural solution of the building is neo-Baroque, and is inspired by its adjacent buildings.

Various activities took place on the first floor of the bishops’ palace where there was an archive, Curia, other diocesan institutions, a buffet and a dining room. The pre-war bishop, Justinas Staugaitis, lived on the second floor beneath the gabled roof, and there were also guest rooms and a hall for different events and a chapel.

In 2018, the building was renovated. The Curia of the Diocese of Telšiai now operates inside the building.

Your comment

Send
Comment successfully added