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Kurhaus

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B. Sruogos g. 2, Birštonas
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Not many people know that Birštonas mineral water resort was a private town until the restoration of independence. What’s even more interesting is that written records of the resort date back to the 14th century when a fortified wooden castle was mentioned in the New Prussian Chronicle by Vygandas Marburgietis (Wigand of Marburg). In 1382, the Grand Master of the Order of the Teutonic Knights was informed that a homestead was founded by the salty water (near the Nemunas river). It happened almost 500 years before the location was granted official status as a resort!

The small town began to be known as an oasis of rest during the 19th century, especially after the nearby resort of Stakliškės burned down. In 1854, an official permit for the establishment of a resort was received, and was the responsibility of the landlord Adomas Bartoševičius and the physician Benediktas Bilinskis. After a couple of decades, Ignotas Kvinta, a landlord from Jieznas, became the owner of the resort and started expanding it. The next owner was Lidija Miller-Kochanovskienė. After the re-establishment of independence, the town, significantly damaged during the First World War, became the property and responsibility of the state and the Lithuanian Red Cross Society started taking care of it.

Birštonas’ Kurhaus (from the German word meaning the living room of a resort) is the only building of such type in Lithuania that was preserved and restored.

It’s important to know that the first Birštonas kurhaus was mentioned in the notes of the Polish poet Vladislavas Sirokomlė (Władysław Syrokomla) in 1855. In documents dating from 1921 it was recorded that the building was significantly abandoned. After it was repaired, an orchestra played inside the kurhaus on Sundays and during holidays. In 1931, the old kurhaus was demolished and replaced with the new one, designed by Romanas Steikūnas, who is considered to be among the most versatile Lithuanian architects working in the interwar period.

Whilst creating one of the most important buildings in the resort, the architect combined modern elements (seen, for example, in the first floor windows) and details of ethnic style, such as the décor of the curtain-rod. The resort’s authorities have been constantly upgrading and improving the building, and have constructed a mineral water pavilion next to it.

During the Second World War a fire in the wooden kurhaus destroyed its interior. In 1960, the building was reconstructed and its volume supplemented with details that were unusual for the interwar period. Currently, exhibitions take place here, and there’s also a restaurant and a concert hall.

Kurhaus

B. Sruogos g. 2, Birštonas

Not many people know that Birštonas mineral water resort was a private town until the restoration of independence. What’s even more interesting is that written records of the resort date back to the 14th century when a fortified wooden castle was mentioned in the New Prussian Chronicle by Vygandas Marburgietis (Wigand of Marburg). In 1382, the Grand Master of the Order of the Teutonic Knights was informed that a homestead was founded by the salty water (near the Nemunas river). It happened almost 500 years before the location was granted official status as a resort!

The small town began to be known as an oasis of rest during the 19th century, especially after the nearby resort of Stakliškės burned down. In 1854, an official permit for the establishment of a resort was received, and was the responsibility of the landlord Adomas Bartoševičius and the physician Benediktas Bilinskis. After a couple of decades, Ignotas Kvinta, a landlord from Jieznas, became the owner of the resort and started expanding it. The next owner was Lidija Miller-Kochanovskienė. After the re-establishment of independence, the town, significantly damaged during the First World War, became the property and responsibility of the state and the Lithuanian Red Cross Society started taking care of it.

Birštonas’ Kurhaus (from the German word meaning the living room of a resort) is the only building of such type in Lithuania that was preserved and restored.

It’s important to know that the first Birštonas kurhaus was mentioned in the notes of the Polish poet Vladislavas Sirokomlė (Władysław Syrokomla) in 1855. In documents dating from 1921 it was recorded that the building was significantly abandoned. After it was repaired, an orchestra played inside the kurhaus on Sundays and during holidays. In 1931, the old kurhaus was demolished and replaced with the new one, designed by Romanas Steikūnas, who is considered to be among the most versatile Lithuanian architects working in the interwar period.

Whilst creating one of the most important buildings in the resort, the architect combined modern elements (seen, for example, in the first floor windows) and details of ethnic style, such as the décor of the curtain-rod. The resort’s authorities have been constantly upgrading and improving the building, and have constructed a mineral water pavilion next to it.

During the Second World War a fire in the wooden kurhaus destroyed its interior. In 1960, the building was reconstructed and its volume supplemented with details that were unusual for the interwar period. Currently, exhibitions take place here, and there’s also a restaurant and a concert hall.

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