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Plungė Railway Station and Plungė House for Railway Workers

(today a regular dwelling house)

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Stoties g. 44, Plungė
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Routes

After the proclamation of Independence, on July 6, 1919, the first train departed from Kaišiadorys to Radviliškis. The restored Republic of Lithuania took up the renovation of the old railway network built by the Russian Empire and the creation of a new railway network already belonging to the Republic of Lithuania. The connection of Klaipėda region with the rest of the country, which took part in 1923, brought a need for a new and faster link for the country to reach Klaipėda’s port.

So in 1923, the main lines were confirmed, among which was also the Amaliai-Telšiai-Kretinga route. In 1926, the section Telšiai-Kužiai was built, and in 1932 the Kretinga-Telšiai one, which united Lithuania proper with Klaipėda via a new section of track. Five new railway stations at Kartena (in Kūlupėnai), Šateikiai, Lieplaukė, Telšiai and Plungė were also built along the route. The latter was opened on October 29, 1932, and is still used to this day. This was a major event in Plungė. Many merchants lived in the city, and for them the line meant quicker export and import. The railway line contributed to the growth and development of the city. The importance of the event is also illustrated by the fact that even the President of the Republic of Lithuania, Antanas Smetona, visited Plungė on the day the line opened.

As the plan was to save money and connect the country via rail as soon as possible, Plungė station was built to the same design as the one in neighbouring Telšiai. These stations, larger than others, are classified as being of the modernised Neoclassical style. It’s similar to the station at Kartena, only this one is asymmetrical. The central volume of the masonry and plaster Plungė station complete with a lobby is built on two floors with side volumes of one storey. The building has a tin roof.

A building known as the house for railway workers of various grades was built near the station. It’s also a building of a standard design, and laconic in the way it’s decorated. A typical feature of such single-storey dwellings are the hip roofs with mansards and the details of the parapet of the expressive station building that can be seen in the decorative elements. Three apartments were established inside the building, one of them for the head of the station. Slightly further along is a water tower, built for the needs of the old steam trains that no longer run.

Plungė Railway Station and Plungė House for Railway Workers

(today a regular dwelling house)

Stoties g. 44, Plungė

After the proclamation of Independence, on July 6, 1919, the first train departed from Kaišiadorys to Radviliškis. The restored Republic of Lithuania took up the renovation of the old railway network built by the Russian Empire and the creation of a new railway network already belonging to the Republic of Lithuania. The connection of Klaipėda region with the rest of the country, which took part in 1923, brought a need for a new and faster link for the country to reach Klaipėda’s port.

So in 1923, the main lines were confirmed, among which was also the Amaliai-Telšiai-Kretinga route. In 1926, the section Telšiai-Kužiai was built, and in 1932 the Kretinga-Telšiai one, which united Lithuania proper with Klaipėda via a new section of track. Five new railway stations at Kartena (in Kūlupėnai), Šateikiai, Lieplaukė, Telšiai and Plungė were also built along the route. The latter was opened on October 29, 1932, and is still used to this day. This was a major event in Plungė. Many merchants lived in the city, and for them the line meant quicker export and import. The railway line contributed to the growth and development of the city. The importance of the event is also illustrated by the fact that even the President of the Republic of Lithuania, Antanas Smetona, visited Plungė on the day the line opened.

As the plan was to save money and connect the country via rail as soon as possible, Plungė station was built to the same design as the one in neighbouring Telšiai. These stations, larger than others, are classified as being of the modernised Neoclassical style. It’s similar to the station at Kartena, only this one is asymmetrical. The central volume of the masonry and plaster Plungė station complete with a lobby is built on two floors with side volumes of one storey. The building has a tin roof.

A building known as the house for railway workers of various grades was built near the station. It’s also a building of a standard design, and laconic in the way it’s decorated. A typical feature of such single-storey dwellings are the hip roofs with mansards and the details of the parapet of the expressive station building that can be seen in the decorative elements. Three apartments were established inside the building, one of them for the head of the station. Slightly further along is a water tower, built for the needs of the old steam trains that no longer run.

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