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Police building

(former hotel and commercial building)

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Vytauto g. 1 and Vytauto g. 3, Plungė county
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The city of Plungė, referred to in written sources since 1567, was granted Magdeburg rights in 1792, although it never managed to exercise them. After the third division of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1795, Plungė was ruled by the Zubovai (Zubov) family, who were counts, from whom Plungė Manor was acquired at the end of the 19th century by the Oginskiai (Ogiński) family who founded one of the first music schools in Lithuania inside the manor as well as a park.

In 1923, Lithuanians accounted for 55% of the city’s residents, and Jews 44%. The Jews also owned most of the city’s businesses, with the richer families located in Vytautas Street, which was built during the interwar period. Between the wars, the development of the city was greatly influenced by a new railway line, the Kučiskis–Pabedinskiai flax and cotton factory, and other Jewish businesses and crafts, and agricultural products of the local Samogitians. In 1941, almost the entire Jewish community of Plungė was destroyed. After the war, the face of Plungė changed dramatically. The plan was for Plungė to become the industrial centre of the entire region, but this never happened. Today, you can take a stroll through the historic part of the city.

At the Samogitian Art Museum (Žemaičių Dailės Muziejus) one can find photographs taken by Ignas Stropus of a fire in Plungė that took place in 1931. It’s also stated that on March 31, 1931, at about 11am, in Vytauto prospektas (Vytautas Avenue) a fire broke out in the house of the merchant Chaimas Restas (Chaim Rest), who was a member of the board of the Jewish People’s Bank. The house was also a hotel, and the fire spread to other buildings whose roofs were covered with shingles and straw.

The history of the hotel and the Restas family is cinematic. The hotel—the first to open in Plungė—was founded by Ester Restienė, the widow of Irma Rest. The hotel began life on Vytautas Street as a small room that could be rented and where delicious food could be prepared for guests. After successfully developing the business, Restienė handed over the management of the hotel to her sons, Leizeris (Leizer), Chaimas (Chaim), and Hillel. However, until her death in the Ninth Fort in Kaunas during the Second World War, Restienė remained the most important person in the family business.

A two storey brick house of Modernist form, curved in the traditional way as was common during the interwar period, standing at one corner of Vytautas Street, was built immediately after the fire, which caused many losses in the city. It’s also known that next to the new masonry hotel, from the side of Vytautas Street, the Restas family established a petrol station with an underground reservoir.

Until the end of 2018, the building was a police station.

Police building

(former hotel and commercial building)

Vytauto g. 1 and Vytauto g. 3, Plungė county

The city of Plungė, referred to in written sources since 1567, was granted Magdeburg rights in 1792, although it never managed to exercise them. After the third division of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1795, Plungė was ruled by the Zubovai (Zubov) family, who were counts, from whom Plungė Manor was acquired at the end of the 19th century by the Oginskiai (Ogiński) family who founded one of the first music schools in Lithuania inside the manor as well as a park.

In 1923, Lithuanians accounted for 55% of the city’s residents, and Jews 44%. The Jews also owned most of the city’s businesses, with the richer families located in Vytautas Street, which was built during the interwar period. Between the wars, the development of the city was greatly influenced by a new railway line, the Kučiskis–Pabedinskiai flax and cotton factory, and other Jewish businesses and crafts, and agricultural products of the local Samogitians. In 1941, almost the entire Jewish community of Plungė was destroyed. After the war, the face of Plungė changed dramatically. The plan was for Plungė to become the industrial centre of the entire region, but this never happened. Today, you can take a stroll through the historic part of the city.

At the Samogitian Art Museum (Žemaičių Dailės Muziejus) one can find photographs taken by Ignas Stropus of a fire in Plungė that took place in 1931. It’s also stated that on March 31, 1931, at about 11am, in Vytauto prospektas (Vytautas Avenue) a fire broke out in the house of the merchant Chaimas Restas (Chaim Rest), who was a member of the board of the Jewish People’s Bank. The house was also a hotel, and the fire spread to other buildings whose roofs were covered with shingles and straw.

The history of the hotel and the Restas family is cinematic. The hotel—the first to open in Plungė—was founded by Ester Restienė, the widow of Irma Rest. The hotel began life on Vytautas Street as a small room that could be rented and where delicious food could be prepared for guests. After successfully developing the business, Restienė handed over the management of the hotel to her sons, Leizeris (Leizer), Chaimas (Chaim), and Hillel. However, until her death in the Ninth Fort in Kaunas during the Second World War, Restienė remained the most important person in the family business.

A two storey brick house of Modernist form, curved in the traditional way as was common during the interwar period, standing at one corner of Vytautas Street, was built immediately after the fire, which caused many losses in the city. It’s also known that next to the new masonry hotel, from the side of Vytautas Street, the Restas family established a petrol station with an underground reservoir.

Until the end of 2018, the building was a police station.

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