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Kurorto g. 6, Druskininkai
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Druskininkai was first mentioned in historical sources in 1596. It’s written that the village of Druskininkai was handed over to the lord of Pervalkas Manor, Mr. Voropay. Already in those days, the inhabitants of the village had noticed the healing powers of its salty springs and thus healed their wounded legs. There’s even information about a dynasty of folk doctors named Sūručiai (Sūrmiesčiai, Suraučiai). Even the word druskininkas means a person engaged in the production and sale of salt.

In 1794, Druskininkai was named a healing location after the King of Poland, Stanislavas Augustas Poniatovskis (Stanisław August Poniatowski), visited and declared its status in a decree. In 1837, Tsar Nikolajus I (Nicholas I) granted a permit for the development of a resort that was already famous for its mud and mineral baths, and by the end of the 19th century the town was known even outside the Russian Empire. During the First World War the resort was severely damaged and was restored in 1930. During the interwar period, the number of people who were treated here grew rapidly. Many new villas were built, and those built previously were repaired.

During the interwar period, when Druskininkai was part of Poland, the number of people receiving various treatments at the resort grew rapidly, thus increasing the number of vacation villas. Druskininkai is known for its distinctive, mostly wooden, recreational architecture. The rapid construction of villas began before the First World War, and was most active until the Second World War.

A lazy morning drinking coffee on the balcony of your room, looking down at the Nemunas flowing below you, this is the luxury that was available to the guests of Druskininkai in around 1930. Unfortunately, no information remains about this sanatorium or the person who designed the largest log building in the city. However, it’s an object that’s worth staying at not only because of its excellent, peaceful location, but also because of its exceptional architecture.

The sanatorium, located at the historical part of Druskininkai and surrounded by different plants and greenery, is T-shaped. The building looks at its most impressive whilst standing in front of it. Four massive columns cover the open porch on both storeys and hold the triangular pediment.

When reconstructing the building, big showcase windows were formed on the ground floor, allowing visitors of the bathhouse a view of the Nemunas, even though they’re not really compatible with other elements of a wooden building. Other elements of the sanatorium have also been changed, although the building has retained its original function. The hotel Vingis operates here, and the nearby hotel Violeta also belongs to the complex.

Sanatorium

Kurorto g. 6, Druskininkai

Druskininkai was first mentioned in historical sources in 1596. It’s written that the village of Druskininkai was handed over to the lord of Pervalkas Manor, Mr. Voropay. Already in those days, the inhabitants of the village had noticed the healing powers of its salty springs and thus healed their wounded legs. There’s even information about a dynasty of folk doctors named Sūručiai (Sūrmiesčiai, Suraučiai). Even the word druskininkas means a person engaged in the production and sale of salt.

In 1794, Druskininkai was named a healing location after the King of Poland, Stanislavas Augustas Poniatovskis (Stanisław August Poniatowski), visited and declared its status in a decree. In 1837, Tsar Nikolajus I (Nicholas I) granted a permit for the development of a resort that was already famous for its mud and mineral baths, and by the end of the 19th century the town was known even outside the Russian Empire. During the First World War the resort was severely damaged and was restored in 1930. During the interwar period, the number of people who were treated here grew rapidly. Many new villas were built, and those built previously were repaired.

During the interwar period, when Druskininkai was part of Poland, the number of people receiving various treatments at the resort grew rapidly, thus increasing the number of vacation villas. Druskininkai is known for its distinctive, mostly wooden, recreational architecture. The rapid construction of villas began before the First World War, and was most active until the Second World War.

A lazy morning drinking coffee on the balcony of your room, looking down at the Nemunas flowing below you, this is the luxury that was available to the guests of Druskininkai in around 1930. Unfortunately, no information remains about this sanatorium or the person who designed the largest log building in the city. However, it’s an object that’s worth staying at not only because of its excellent, peaceful location, but also because of its exceptional architecture.

The sanatorium, located at the historical part of Druskininkai and surrounded by different plants and greenery, is T-shaped. The building looks at its most impressive whilst standing in front of it. Four massive columns cover the open porch on both storeys and hold the triangular pediment.

When reconstructing the building, big showcase windows were formed on the ground floor, allowing visitors of the bathhouse a view of the Nemunas, even though they’re not really compatible with other elements of a wooden building. Other elements of the sanatorium have also been changed, although the building has retained its original function. The hotel Vingis operates here, and the nearby hotel Violeta also belongs to the complex.

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