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Telšiai Crafts School

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Muziejaus g. 29, Telšiai
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Telšiai, located in the Curonian lands, was first mentioned in written sources in 1450. In 1791, the city was granted the Magdeburg Rights. During the same year, Bernardine monks built a stone church on a hill, which, in 1926, after the establishment of the Telšiai Diocese, became a Cathedral. The first school was established in 1793. In 1875, a yeshiva was opened in the city, although it was moved to Cleveland in 1941. Telšiai was developing rapidly both at the end of the 19th century and during the interwar period. A railway line, built in 1932, became one of the main contributors towards its growth together with industrial development and numerous public initiatives. The legacy of this rapid development that took place in the interwar period is an ensemble of Modernist architecture.

On October 4, 1936, a total of three new modern buildings were solemnly opened in Telšiai, namely the hall of the Curia of the Diocese of Telšiai, the M. Valančius Gymnasium and the crafts school which had already been established for a couple of years. Its headmaster was Karolis Šimonis, who finished his studies in Prague.

A talented and young architect, who wasn’t well-known and who’s probably never realised his full potential, built several memorable houses in Kaunas before moving to Telšiai where he created a unique cubist Orthodox church. But a kind of aura of unfulfillment remained, and continues to be associated with his name in the history of Lithuanian architecture, wrote the architectural researcher Marija Oniščik with all due respect for the author of the design of the new building, Vsevolodas Kopylovas (Vsevolod Kopylov). Looking at the idea only, the Orthodox church was superior to the building of the crafts school, but the latter was aptly called the constructive palace by the author.

Several parts of the building are combined in a clever way, and the red brick masonry between the windows compliments the white façade and goes well with the roof—it’s possible that the school’s particular architectural style inspired its students to apply similar artistic principles to their work. After all, Telšiai Crafts School is considered to be the predecessor of the Telšiai Faculty of the Vilnius Academy of Arts. By the way, furniture produced here in 1939 travelled to the United States and was awarded a gold medal at an exhibition in New York.

In 1959, the Technicum of Applied Art in Telšiai was situated here. Today the building belongs to the Telšiai Faculty of Žemaitija College, and an arts incubator is located here.

Telšiai Crafts School

Muziejaus g. 29, Telšiai

Telšiai, located in the Curonian lands, was first mentioned in written sources in 1450. In 1791, the city was granted the Magdeburg Rights. During the same year, Bernardine monks built a stone church on a hill, which, in 1926, after the establishment of the Telšiai Diocese, became a Cathedral. The first school was established in 1793. In 1875, a yeshiva was opened in the city, although it was moved to Cleveland in 1941. Telšiai was developing rapidly both at the end of the 19th century and during the interwar period. A railway line, built in 1932, became one of the main contributors towards its growth together with industrial development and numerous public initiatives. The legacy of this rapid development that took place in the interwar period is an ensemble of Modernist architecture.

On October 4, 1936, a total of three new modern buildings were solemnly opened in Telšiai, namely the hall of the Curia of the Diocese of Telšiai, the M. Valančius Gymnasium and the crafts school which had already been established for a couple of years. Its headmaster was Karolis Šimonis, who finished his studies in Prague.

A talented and young architect, who wasn’t well-known and who’s probably never realised his full potential, built several memorable houses in Kaunas before moving to Telšiai where he created a unique cubist Orthodox church. But a kind of aura of unfulfillment remained, and continues to be associated with his name in the history of Lithuanian architecture, wrote the architectural researcher Marija Oniščik with all due respect for the author of the design of the new building, Vsevolodas Kopylovas (Vsevolod Kopylov). Looking at the idea only, the Orthodox church was superior to the building of the crafts school, but the latter was aptly called the constructive palace by the author.

Several parts of the building are combined in a clever way, and the red brick masonry between the windows compliments the white façade and goes well with the roof—it’s possible that the school’s particular architectural style inspired its students to apply similar artistic principles to their work. After all, Telšiai Crafts School is considered to be the predecessor of the Telšiai Faculty of the Vilnius Academy of Arts. By the way, furniture produced here in 1939 travelled to the United States and was awarded a gold medal at an exhibition in New York.

In 1959, the Technicum of Applied Art in Telšiai was situated here. Today the building belongs to the Telšiai Faculty of Žemaitija College, and an arts incubator is located here.

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