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Telšiai Žemaitė School

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Šviesos g. 15, Telšiai
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On October 4, 1936, a total of three new buildings were solemnly opened in Telšiai. The first was the new Bishop Motiejus Valančius’ school, which was originally established in 1918. It was a long-awaited celebration for the community and students who previously had to work and study in two buildings that weren’t suitable for education, despite the fact that such people as Vydūnas and Šatrijos Ragana would have taught children there.

The architect of the building, which was modern in every sense of the word, Steponas Stulginskis, learned the principles of Modernism whilst studying in Prague. In his biography, Stulginskis has more educational buildings, including Telšiai Elementary School that was opened in the same year. He also designed a modern district hospital with a separate operating theatre, the equipment of which was bought in Germany at a cost of 100,000 litas (the former Lithuanian currency).

Whilst working with educational establishments, the architect usually designed the entire area including the sports grounds, playgrounds and gardens. Nevertheless, this particular gymnasium is probably the purest example of Modernism and Constructivism within its context. Even though this may sound absolutely incredible today, the teachers at the school all paid one month’s salary so that the building could have a balcony.

After the war, the building’s architect, Steponas Stulginskis, was the chairman of the board of the Lithuanian Union of Architects and the Dean of the Faculty of Architecture of Kaunas State University (later Kaunas Polytechnic Institute, Kaunas University of Technology). He was later sent into exile, and after returning to Lithuania he continued to work in the fields of architecture and construction.

During the German occupation, 50 Jewish gymnasium students were forced into the ghetto in Telšiai. During the war there was a hospital in the building, so the students once again had to study in buildings that weren’t suitable. The community managed to preserve the gymnasium’s library, as books and other items were stored in a shed at the town’s Alka museum.

The name of the classic Lithuanian author was given to the girls’ gymnasium in 1945, during the centenary celebrations of her birth. Later, after the girls were joined by boys, the institution became the Žemaitė Secondary School. Today it’s a gymnasium. During the Soviet occupation, the teaching of the Lithuanian language was intensified here. The list of former students who studied at the gymnasium is impressive, among them Vytautas Mačernis, Alma Adamkienė, Alfredas Bumblauskas and many other artists, public figures, scientists and athletes.

Telšiai Žemaitė School

Šviesos g. 15, Telšiai

On October 4, 1936, a total of three new buildings were solemnly opened in Telšiai. The first was the new Bishop Motiejus Valančius’ school, which was originally established in 1918. It was a long-awaited celebration for the community and students who previously had to work and study in two buildings that weren’t suitable for education, despite the fact that such people as Vydūnas and Šatrijos Ragana would have taught children there.

The architect of the building, which was modern in every sense of the word, Steponas Stulginskis, learned the principles of Modernism whilst studying in Prague. In his biography, Stulginskis has more educational buildings, including Telšiai Elementary School that was opened in the same year. He also designed a modern district hospital with a separate operating theatre, the equipment of which was bought in Germany at a cost of 100,000 litas (the former Lithuanian currency).

Whilst working with educational establishments, the architect usually designed the entire area including the sports grounds, playgrounds and gardens. Nevertheless, this particular gymnasium is probably the purest example of Modernism and Constructivism within its context. Even though this may sound absolutely incredible today, the teachers at the school all paid one month’s salary so that the building could have a balcony.

After the war, the building’s architect, Steponas Stulginskis, was the chairman of the board of the Lithuanian Union of Architects and the Dean of the Faculty of Architecture of Kaunas State University (later Kaunas Polytechnic Institute, Kaunas University of Technology). He was later sent into exile, and after returning to Lithuania he continued to work in the fields of architecture and construction.

During the German occupation, 50 Jewish gymnasium students were forced into the ghetto in Telšiai. During the war there was a hospital in the building, so the students once again had to study in buildings that weren’t suitable. The community managed to preserve the gymnasium’s library, as books and other items were stored in a shed at the town’s Alka museum.

The name of the classic Lithuanian author was given to the girls’ gymnasium in 1945, during the centenary celebrations of her birth. Later, after the girls were joined by boys, the institution became the Žemaitė Secondary School. Today it’s a gymnasium. During the Soviet occupation, the teaching of the Lithuanian language was intensified here. The list of former students who studied at the gymnasium is impressive, among them Vytautas Mačernis, Alma Adamkienė, Alfredas Bumblauskas and many other artists, public figures, scientists and athletes.

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