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The complex of villas in Druskininkai

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Maironio g. 14 and Maironio g. 12, Druskininkai
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Druskininkai was first mentioned in historical sources in 1596. It’s written that the village of Druskininkai was handed over to the lord of Pervalkas Manor, Mr. Voropay. Already in those days, the inhabitants of the village had noticed the healing powers of its salty springs and thus healed their wounded legs. There’s even information about a dynasty of folk doctors named Sūručiai (Sūrmiesčiai, Suraučiai). Even the word druskininkas means a person engaged in the production and sale of salt.

In 1794, Druskininkai was named a healing location after the King of Poland, Stanislavas Augustas Poniatovskis (Stanisław August Poniatowski), visited and declared its status in a decree. In 1837, Tsar Nikolajus I (Nicholas I) granted a permit for the development of a resort that was already famous for its mud and mineral baths, and by the end of the 19th century the town was known even outside the Russian Empire. During the First World War the resort was severely damaged and was restored in 1930. During the interwar period, the number of people who were treated here grew rapidly. Many new villas were built, and those built previously were repaired.

Further from the bustling centre of Druskininkai, lovers of architecture are in for a rich treat of elements of carved wood. The complex is comprised of two villas surrounded by different kinds of plants and greenery, which fit perfectly into the surroundings of the resort. The more elegant of the villas, marked with the number 14, has the feeling of an Italian romance.

Wooden buildings appeared at the end of the 19th century. At that time and even later, before the First World War, Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, Petras Rimša and other important artists and intellectuals were all big fans of the resort.

It’s said that the complex once belonged to a local businessman named Frenkelis (Frankel). He set up a restaurant in the villa and was one of the first people in the city to rent rooms for holidaymakers. The first name of the villa was Imperial. The ivory-coloured villa is made from logs that are hidden behind panelling. The façades of the building are abundantly decorated with lattice elements (the so-called Russian style). The smaller, one-floor complex building is more modest, but is also rich in decorative details.


Don’t miss the villa which is similar to the aforementioned complex in its mood (even though it’s more Swiss than Italian) which was built slightly later and is located at Maironio g. 16. You might want to visit the popular cafe called Širdelė (Heart) that’s been located inside the building for many years. All these villas haven’t changed their function in decades and today are a part of the leisure complex Dainava.

The complex of villas in Druskininkai

Maironio g. 14 and Maironio g. 12, Druskininkai

Druskininkai was first mentioned in historical sources in 1596. It’s written that the village of Druskininkai was handed over to the lord of Pervalkas Manor, Mr. Voropay. Already in those days, the inhabitants of the village had noticed the healing powers of its salty springs and thus healed their wounded legs. There’s even information about a dynasty of folk doctors named Sūručiai (Sūrmiesčiai, Suraučiai). Even the word druskininkas means a person engaged in the production and sale of salt.

In 1794, Druskininkai was named a healing location after the King of Poland, Stanislavas Augustas Poniatovskis (Stanisław August Poniatowski), visited and declared its status in a decree. In 1837, Tsar Nikolajus I (Nicholas I) granted a permit for the development of a resort that was already famous for its mud and mineral baths, and by the end of the 19th century the town was known even outside the Russian Empire. During the First World War the resort was severely damaged and was restored in 1930. During the interwar period, the number of people who were treated here grew rapidly. Many new villas were built, and those built previously were repaired.

Further from the bustling centre of Druskininkai, lovers of architecture are in for a rich treat of elements of carved wood. The complex is comprised of two villas surrounded by different kinds of plants and greenery, which fit perfectly into the surroundings of the resort. The more elegant of the villas, marked with the number 14, has the feeling of an Italian romance.

Wooden buildings appeared at the end of the 19th century. At that time and even later, before the First World War, Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, Petras Rimša and other important artists and intellectuals were all big fans of the resort.

It’s said that the complex once belonged to a local businessman named Frenkelis (Frankel). He set up a restaurant in the villa and was one of the first people in the city to rent rooms for holidaymakers. The first name of the villa was Imperial. The ivory-coloured villa is made from logs that are hidden behind panelling. The façades of the building are abundantly decorated with lattice elements (the so-called Russian style). The smaller, one-floor complex building is more modest, but is also rich in decorative details.


Don’t miss the villa which is similar to the aforementioned complex in its mood (even though it’s more Swiss than Italian) which was built slightly later and is located at Maironio g. 16. You might want to visit the popular cafe called Širdelė (Heart) that’s been located inside the building for many years. All these villas haven’t changed their function in decades and today are a part of the leisure complex Dainava.

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