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Villa Maurė

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Laisvės a. 21, Druskininkai
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Druskininkai was first mentioned in historical sources in 1596. It’s written that the village of Druskininkai was handed over to the lord of Pervalkas Manor, Mr. Voropay. Already in those days, the inhabitants of the village had noticed the healing powers of its salty springs and thus healed their wounded legs. There’s even information about a dynasty of folk doctors named Sūručiai (Sūrmiesčiai, Suraučiai). Even the word druskininkas means a person engaged in the production and sale of salt.

In 1794, Druskininkai was named a healing location after the King of Poland, Stanislavo Augusto Poniatovskio (Stanisław August Poniatowski), visited and declared its status in a decree. In 1837, Tsar Nicholas I granted a permit for the development of a resort that was already famous for its mud and mineral baths, and by the end of the 19th century the town was known even outside the Russian Empire. During the First World War the resort was severely damaged and was restored in 1930. During the interwar period, the number of people who were treated here grew rapidly. Many new villas were built, and those built previously were repaired.

During the interwar period, when Druskininkai was part of Poland, the number of people receiving various treatments at the resort grew rapidly, thus increasing the number of vacation villas. Druskininkai is known for its distinctive, mostly wooden, recreational architecture. The rapid construction of villas began before the First World War, and was most active until the Second World War.

It’s not known who created the design of this resort-type building in the historic part of Druskininkai. It’s believed that this famous eclectic urban landmark facing Laisvės aikštė (Freedom Square) with its main façade was built at the end of the 19th century or at the beginning of the 20th century, which was when apartments were set up inside this two-storey building.

The design of the villa that fits in a small plot is square, and the staircase to the second floor is located in the centre. A two-storey balcony is found on the main façade of the villa, and the most picture-worthy elements would have to be its lattice carvings. Interestingly, architectural historians, perhaps as a joke or maybe seriously, say that it’s possible to see the features of terems—the women’s quarters (two-storey manor buildings)—in this villa. The term terem is usually associated with Ivan the Terrible, who ruled Russia during the 16th century.

During the Soviet occupation, the villa was abandoned and left in critical condition. In 1985, it was reconstructed and apartments were adapted for the provision of recreation services. In 2004, repair works were carried out. Today, hotel Dalija with its 11 apartments is located inside the building. The authentic carved staircase has remained a part of the interior.

Villa Maurė

Laisvės a. 21, Druskininkai

Druskininkai was first mentioned in historical sources in 1596. It’s written that the village of Druskininkai was handed over to the lord of Pervalkas Manor, Mr. Voropay. Already in those days, the inhabitants of the village had noticed the healing powers of its salty springs and thus healed their wounded legs. There’s even information about a dynasty of folk doctors named Sūručiai (Sūrmiesčiai, Suraučiai). Even the word druskininkas means a person engaged in the production and sale of salt.

In 1794, Druskininkai was named a healing location after the King of Poland, Stanislavo Augusto Poniatovskio (Stanisław August Poniatowski), visited and declared its status in a decree. In 1837, Tsar Nicholas I granted a permit for the development of a resort that was already famous for its mud and mineral baths, and by the end of the 19th century the town was known even outside the Russian Empire. During the First World War the resort was severely damaged and was restored in 1930. During the interwar period, the number of people who were treated here grew rapidly. Many new villas were built, and those built previously were repaired.

During the interwar period, when Druskininkai was part of Poland, the number of people receiving various treatments at the resort grew rapidly, thus increasing the number of vacation villas. Druskininkai is known for its distinctive, mostly wooden, recreational architecture. The rapid construction of villas began before the First World War, and was most active until the Second World War.

It’s not known who created the design of this resort-type building in the historic part of Druskininkai. It’s believed that this famous eclectic urban landmark facing Laisvės aikštė (Freedom Square) with its main façade was built at the end of the 19th century or at the beginning of the 20th century, which was when apartments were set up inside this two-storey building.

The design of the villa that fits in a small plot is square, and the staircase to the second floor is located in the centre. A two-storey balcony is found on the main façade of the villa, and the most picture-worthy elements would have to be its lattice carvings. Interestingly, architectural historians, perhaps as a joke or maybe seriously, say that it’s possible to see the features of terems—the women’s quarters (two-storey manor buildings)—in this villa. The term terem is usually associated with Ivan the Terrible, who ruled Russia during the 16th century.

During the Soviet occupation, the villa was abandoned and left in critical condition. In 1985, it was reconstructed and apartments were adapted for the provision of recreation services. In 2004, repair works were carried out. Today, hotel Dalija with its 11 apartments is located inside the building. The authentic carved staircase has remained a part of the interior.

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