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Villa Vaidilutė

(current Exile and Resistance Museum)

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J. Basanavičiaus g. 21, Palanga
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Palanga is one of the oldest settlements in Lithuania, mentioned in written sources as far back as 1161. Between the 15th and 17th centuries it was the most important port in Lithuania. From 1819 until the First World War, Palanga and many surrounding settlements belonged to the Curonian Governorate, and until 1921 it was a part of Latvia. The process of the port city becoming a resort accelerated in 1824 when a colonel in the tsar’s army, Count Mykolas Tiškevičius (Michał Tyszkiewicz), became the owner of Palanga. Vytautas, S. Darius and S. Girėnas, and J. Basanavičius streets became the centre of the new city, and the latter street also became the main thoroughfare. The new architecture of the resort (which officially got this title in 1909), which is mostly wooden, matched the scenic seaside nature. This trend continued throughout the interwar period. The preserved wooden villas in Palanga have been adapted to suit different needs. Here’s the story of one such building.

In the main spot for tourists visiting Palanga, J. Basanavičius Street, a strange house stands among bars playing Russian music. The Exile and Resistance Museum, located in the centre of the resort, resembles a little boat among fast, big ships, wrote the journalist Dovydas Pancerovas in 2015. The aforementioned boat is the wooden villa Vaidilutė that’s sometimes also called Lilliput.
Vaidilutė arose on a plot of land belonging to a much larger villa in the 19th century, Dievaitis, which didn’t survive. It’s known that a priest by the name of Liudvikas Kasperavičius bought the plot from the Tiškevičiai (Tyszkiewicz) family after the First World War and signed it over to his sister Bronislava Zabulionienė. The exact date when the villa was built is unknown, but it’s assumed that it happened around 1936, since it existed in the city plan of 1937.

The small villa with a rectangular layout is decorated with carvings that are typical of the era, with the focus on the balcony and the porch. What’s more, the arches of the porch, which aren’t a typical element for this type of building in Lithuania, even have oriental features. The wooden villa has been restored qualitatively. The only mismatch is the way the windows were divided and split, a detail typical of the interwar period, that wasn’t maintained when the windows were changed.

Vaidilutė was nationalised by the Soviet Union and the Exile and Resistance Museum was founded in the villa in 1993, with much attention being paid to the leader of the resistance movement, General Jonas Žemaitis, who was born and lived in Palanga and who was a honorary citizen of the town. In 2014, the building was given the status of an immovable cultural property of local significance.

Villa Vaidilutė

(current Exile and Resistance Museum)

J. Basanavičiaus g. 21, Palanga

Palanga is one of the oldest settlements in Lithuania, mentioned in written sources as far back as 1161. Between the 15th and 17th centuries it was the most important port in Lithuania. From 1819 until the First World War, Palanga and many surrounding settlements belonged to the Curonian Governorate, and until 1921 it was a part of Latvia. The process of the port city becoming a resort accelerated in 1824 when a colonel in the tsar’s army, Count Mykolas Tiškevičius (Michał Tyszkiewicz), became the owner of Palanga. Vytautas, S. Darius and S. Girėnas, and J. Basanavičius streets became the centre of the new city, and the latter street also became the main thoroughfare. The new architecture of the resort (which officially got this title in 1909), which is mostly wooden, matched the scenic seaside nature. This trend continued throughout the interwar period. The preserved wooden villas in Palanga have been adapted to suit different needs. Here’s the story of one such building.

In the main spot for tourists visiting Palanga, J. Basanavičius Street, a strange house stands among bars playing Russian music. The Exile and Resistance Museum, located in the centre of the resort, resembles a little boat among fast, big ships, wrote the journalist Dovydas Pancerovas in 2015. The aforementioned boat is the wooden villa Vaidilutė that’s sometimes also called Lilliput.
Vaidilutė arose on a plot of land belonging to a much larger villa in the 19th century, Dievaitis, which didn’t survive. It’s known that a priest by the name of Liudvikas Kasperavičius bought the plot from the Tiškevičiai (Tyszkiewicz) family after the First World War and signed it over to his sister Bronislava Zabulionienė. The exact date when the villa was built is unknown, but it’s assumed that it happened around 1936, since it existed in the city plan of 1937.

The small villa with a rectangular layout is decorated with carvings that are typical of the era, with the focus on the balcony and the porch. What’s more, the arches of the porch, which aren’t a typical element for this type of building in Lithuania, even have oriental features. The wooden villa has been restored qualitatively. The only mismatch is the way the windows were divided and split, a detail typical of the interwar period, that wasn’t maintained when the windows were changed.

Vaidilutė was nationalised by the Soviet Union and the Exile and Resistance Museum was founded in the villa in 1993, with much attention being paid to the leader of the resistance movement, General Jonas Žemaitis, who was born and lived in Palanga and who was a honorary citizen of the town. In 2014, the building was given the status of an immovable cultural property of local significance.

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